In the News: Abortion on the Supreme Court Docket, Russell Moore leaves the ERLC, God Bless the USA Bible, and updated CDC Guidance.

Modern-Cloister-NEW

In this episode of the Modern Cloister, we discuss some news from May, including the Supreme Court deciding to hear a Mississippi abortion law; Russell Moore steps down as president of the Ethics and Religious Life Commission; the upcoming ‘God Bless the USA’ Bible; and the updated CDC guidance on masks and gatherings (like church). 

It will be about a year before we hear anything else about the abortion case. It could be a more in the right direction, but I remain skeptical (I’ve written before about Trump and the Supreme Court). It has been a wild six or so years with Evangelicals in the news for politics. We (or at least 81%, though less in 2020) abandoned our morals (we went from most likely to say character matters in 2012, to least likely in 2016) and often the reason told was, ‘for the judges’. So, not is the chance, I suppose, to see if it was worth it. It is important to remember that this case would not ban abortion in America (nor would overturning Roe), which is one reason I’ve written that Evangelicals shouldn’t be single issue voters. I’m tired of writing about politics, and even more tired of talking about it. Hopefully, In the News next month won’t have any, though that seems unlikely. 

After we published, news also came out that roughly 15% of Americans believe in QAnon; though it looks like some, including 538, have issues with the polling. However, apparently, even asking different ways, at different times, surveys still finds support to be around this level (and up to 20%). Supporters are disproportionately Evangelical whites and Hispanics. Meaning it is a huge part of our church. So, while major denominations and famous pastors are obsessed with ‘wokeness’ and rooting out CRT (while denying the Trinity, as I’ve written about before), a huge proportion of our people in our pews believe things such as a global pedofile ring is in control of the media/Washington or that Biden is a body double. Meanwhile, 60% of people can’t tell you the Great Commission, and only 9% of people can name the 10 Commandments (a staggering 14% can name only 1). The disconnect is so great that the current hero for the SBC is an atheist, while Russell Moore no longer works for them (if you are curious as to why we brought up the SBC again). 

Also, and I can’t seem to find too many good sources on this, but we mentioned Zondervan was part of the Bless the USA Bible. It appears the content is published elsewhere, Zondervan was only involved as they are the copyright holder to the NIV. It appears that they have pulled their licensing and will not be involved. I’ll try to update as more comes out. I applaud them for their decision, but they still allowed the NIV in the ‘Patriot’s’ Bible, which similarly doesn’t have any commentary or notes, but a few articles interspersed throughout, that have incorrect historical notes about American from an amatuer ‘historian’ (looking at his bio, he has neither pastoral or history training from any accredited institutions.) Also, you can read a good article from the perspective a non-American, that I mentioned during the Pod.

Interview with Todd Hains and Natasha Kennedy Modern Cloister

In this episode, we sit down with Todd Hains, editor, and Natasha Kennedy, illustrator, who together have shaped the creation and launch of a new children's books series called "FatCat" that aims to make the practice of catechism both accessible and engaging for children and families alike. There are three books in the series so far (Apostles' Creed, Lord's Prayer, and King of Christmas) with more to come in 2023.  About FatCat Books  How can anyone, no matter how young or old, grasp the message of the Bible? The church’s answer has always been the catechism. Maybe “catechism” sounds like a scary word. But it shouldn’t! The catechism teaches us what the Bible teaches us: our faith. The church’s catechism is the central texts of faith—the Apostles’ Creed, the Ten Commandments, and the Lord’s Prayer. The catechism is “fat.” It’s bursting at the seams with meaning, challenge, and comfort. It’s concise, but it’s also deep. Most importantly, it should be familiar. FatCat is a way of making the catechism approachable. And so this book has an actual fat cat hidden throughout. Search for him with your child as you enjoy this book together, and hide the words of the catechism in your heart. Learn more at the Lexham Press website.  
  1. Interview with Todd Hains and Natasha Kennedy
  2. Interview with Hannah Nation
  3. Soli Deo Gloria (God’s Glory Alone)
  4. Solus Christus (Christ Alone)
  5. Sola Fide (Faith Alone)

In The News: Losing Our Religion, Refugee Cap, Human/Monkey Embryo’s, Women Songwriters, and Dawkins Excommunicated

Modern-Cloister-NEW

   

We are almost at the end of the month, so it is time for our latest Modern Cloister edition of In The News. Last month we did more of a deep dive on a major story, a smaller story, then one story from each of us. This time we are trying something a little different, with just firing relatively quickly, through five stories over the past month. Please let me know if one is better than the other.

Our five topics are:

Losing Our Religion (Gallup Poll, Russell Moore, 538 Podcast)

Refugees Cap (Christianity Today, Religious News Service, My Review of Seeking Refuge)

Human/Monkey Embryo’s (Nature)

Women Songwriters

Dawkins Excommunicated (Guardian)

Hope you enjoyed this episode, please visit ModernCloister.com for more.

Interview with Todd Hains and Natasha Kennedy Modern Cloister

In this episode, we sit down with Todd Hains, editor, and Natasha Kennedy, illustrator, who together have shaped the creation and launch of a new children's books series called "FatCat" that aims to make the practice of catechism both accessible and engaging for children and families alike. There are three books in the series so far (Apostles' Creed, Lord's Prayer, and King of Christmas) with more to come in 2023.  About FatCat Books  How can anyone, no matter how young or old, grasp the message of the Bible? The church’s answer has always been the catechism. Maybe “catechism” sounds like a scary word. But it shouldn’t! The catechism teaches us what the Bible teaches us: our faith. The church’s catechism is the central texts of faith—the Apostles’ Creed, the Ten Commandments, and the Lord’s Prayer. The catechism is “fat.” It’s bursting at the seams with meaning, challenge, and comfort. It’s concise, but it’s also deep. Most importantly, it should be familiar. FatCat is a way of making the catechism approachable. And so this book has an actual fat cat hidden throughout. Search for him with your child as you enjoy this book together, and hide the words of the catechism in your heart. Learn more at the Lexham Press website.  
  1. Interview with Todd Hains and Natasha Kennedy
  2. Interview with Hannah Nation
  3. Soli Deo Gloria (God’s Glory Alone)
  4. Solus Christus (Christ Alone)
  5. Sola Fide (Faith Alone)

Stuff from last week

I haven’t been posting much recently, partly due to time and partly due to disinclination, but last week a came across a few things I found interesting, that I thought I’d share. The plan was for it to go up on Friday, but the Monday Morning Wife and I had our 10th Anniversary and I got distracted.

Russell Moore spoke on The Gospel Coalition Podcast about the obstacles of religious liberty. Depending on your perspective, it’s not what you think. I thought the points he makes about us looking too much for the government to help us and enforce our view of morality were really good; though he does fail to note the painful irony that some of the biggest pushers for ‘religious liberty’ and government enforced morality are often the most ardent anti-government.

Somewhat related, Theocast talks about losing a generation at church. I’m less concerned than most people, though probably not concerned enough, because I think it is inevitable. We were never a ‘Christian Nation’, whatever that means, but for the most of our history, we’ve been a solidly Christian culture, but we aren’t any more. This means we are shedding some of the cultural only hanger’s on. I guess I should care more, but I don’t.

The other thing that stuck out to me about this particular episode was the lack of political honesty. There is one quick mention/jab about not agree with ‘they younger people’ and their politics, but no real discussion about the impact politics has played on losing more and more young people. When I was growing up, Monica Lewinsky was the worst thing ever, a national moral tragedy. Many of the same people publicly deriding Clinton are now, 20 years later, some of the most vocal supporters of Trump. A democrat being immoral is cause for massive public outcry, but these people really don’t seem to give a shit how many hookers and pornstars a republican bangs. All these leaders have traded in the Gospel of Christ of the promise of power from Christian Nationalism, and we are the lost generation?

I could go on and on about this, because it pisses me off so, but if the ‘church’ keeps acting like questioning the Moral Majority or St. Ronnie is blasphemy, and cannot have adult conversations about political issues such as healthcare, minimum wage, income inequality, etc. without resorting to beating up tired old strawmen or just screaming ‘socialism’, we are going hemorrhage anyone under 65 faster than we can imagine.

Speaking of being somewhat bad with economics, I started a new book – Practicing the King’s Economy: Honoring Jesus in How We Work, Earn, Spend, Save, and Give
It seems really good so far, except they seem to think per capita GDP is useful measure, confuse mean for median, don’t accurately represent inflation, and ignore income inequality. I guess this isn’t surprising, because those things tend to get political, and they state at the beginning, they don’t want to do that, for, you know…reasons. Anyway from a Biblical prospective, it is pretty interesting so far, especially the focus on community.

I haven’t written many reviews lately because I’m still trying to power through this – 50 Core Truths of the Christian Faith: A Guide to Understanding and Teaching Theology I’m a big fan of theology, and the part where he gets rolling are really good, but it is slow going as it is a bit repetitive, a little redundant, and well, over 400 pages.

Lastly for books, I read Notes From the Underground, which is really interesting, but I have this copy – Notes From Underground And The Grand Inquisitor. I recommend against this as the second half of the books is an excerpt from The Brothers Karamazov (Everyman’s Library), which I already own.

Finally, you may have seen that we moved our embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. There is plenty written out there about the political consequences of this, but I found this article from a Catholic viewpoint to be interesting. If you didn’t grow up in the dispensational work, or studied your way out, Christian Zionism can seem really odd, so I appreciate the view from someone else.

That’s all for now, hopefully, I’ll have some reviews up soon.